Wasserman Schultz Honors Women's History Month

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Washington, DC, March 10, 2017 | comments
Each March, we honor and remember all of the remarkable women who came before us. The women who worked to make this world a better place – more just, more fair, and more kind. Many decades ago, there was no one who came before them to show the way. They had to be the ones to decide how to shatter the glass ceilings and make it possible for the women who came after them to follow suit and break even more new ground. One of these women who paved the way for future generations is Dr. Sheila L. Chamberlain, a constituent of mine from Hollywood
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Each March, we honor and remember all of the remarkable women who came before us. The women who worked to make this world a better place – more just, more fair, and more kind.

Many decades ago, there was no one who came before them to show the way. They had to be the ones to decide how to shatter the glass ceilings and make it possible for the women who came after them to follow suit and break even more new ground.

One of these women who paved the way for future generations is Dr. Sheila L. Chamberlain, a constituent of mine from Hollywood.

Dr. Sheila L. Chamberlain has the distinction of being the U.S. Army’s first African-American Woman Combat Intelligence Pilot.

Having served three tours in the Republic of Korea and Latin America and served active duty during the Grenada/Panama Invasion, Ms. Chamberlain’s distinguished 15-year military career has led to numerous recognitions including the National Defense Medal, the Tuskegee Airman Blades Award, the General George C. Marshall Award and the Meritorious Service Medal.

In the aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, Dr. Chamberlain was part of a unit sent to assist South Floridians. It was during that time that Dr. Chamberlain retired from the military and was asked to provide testimony before the U.S. House Armed Services Committee on women pilots in combat. When asked if she wished to continue her military career, she replied “I have survived and hopefully this will open the door for future women who just want to fly for their country.” And opening the door was exactly what she did for generations who follow.

In addition to serving her country, Ms. Chamberlain holds a J.D. from the University of Miami School of Law and a B.A. degree from Spelman College in Atlanta with Post graduate studies in Public Administration from the University of Oklahoma.

Dr. Chamberlain’s remarkable career in our United States Armed Forces has helped knock down so many doors to opportunity for future generations of girls and women. Her advocacy on behalf of women from all backgrounds will continue to inspire countless generations of girls to pursue their passion, never losing sight that all is possible to anyone who has a dream.

SOURCE: ORGANIZATION OF BLACK AEROSPACE PROFESSIONALS

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