Wasserman Schultz Marks National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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Washington, DC, October 1, 2015 | comments
Today marks the beginning of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Like so many others who have been affected by this disease, this month holds a deep and personal significance for me and my family. Breast cancer affects women and men of all ages, races and ethnicities and their loved ones. Some women, including Ashkenazi Jews like myself and African Americans, are disproportionately impacted, but many are not aware of their risks. I was not even aware of my own risk. At 41 and just months after a clean mammogram, I heard those terrible words: you have breast cancer.
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U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (FL-23) issued the following statement to mark October as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month:

“Today marks the beginning of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Like so many others who have been affected by this disease, this month holds a deep and personal significance for me and my family.

“Breast cancer affects women and men of all ages, races and ethnicities and their loved ones. Some women, including Ashkenazi Jews like myself and African Americans, are disproportionately impacted, but many are not aware of their risks. I was not even aware of my own risk. At 41 and just months after a clean mammogram, I heard those terrible words: you have breast cancer.  

“When I was declared cancer-free, I knew I had to join the national breast cancer awareness movement and use my personal story and voice as a legislator to empower other women and men with the resources and tools people need to combat this disease.  In response to guidelines this year that potentially put mammography coverage at risk for women between 40 and 49, I’ve worked with my colleague Renee Ellmers of North Carolina to introduce the PALS Act, which would ensure that women who need them have coverage for these critical preventative services.

“Over the past few years, we have made enormous strides in understanding the science of breast cancer and developing new and effective treatments. We must take this month to raise awareness about not only the risks breast cancer poses, but also to reinforce our commitment to ensuring that every American has access to information, screenings and treatments they need. The Affordable Care Act protects access to critical life-saving screenings and health insurance companies can no longer discriminate against women like me for having a pre-existing condition. We must continue to ensure that all women who need them have access to these services, and that we continue to invest in our national health research institutions that have been at the forefront of combatting this disease. As more and more people survive breast cancer, we also need to look for ways to support them.

“National Breast Cancer Awareness Month is a time to make our voices heard and to educate every new generation of daughters, sisters, wives and friends about their risks. It is also a time to celebrate the success stories and remember those we have lost.”

 

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Contact:

Sean Bartlett, Sean.Bartlett@mail.house.gov, 202.225.7931

Geoff Burgan, Geoff.Burgan@mail.house.gov, 202.225.7931

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