Wasserman Schultz Pushes Confederate Base Name Changes in Military Construction-VA Funding Bill

f t # e
Washington, July 6, 2020 | comments
“Our brave servicemembers should not have to live and train on bases named for traitors to the cause of creating a more perfect union,” Wasserman Schultz said.
share: f t

The chairwoman of the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Subcommittee, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (FL-23) will require a renaming process to begin at military bases named after Confederate officers in order for construction funding to commence at those military installations.

The House Appropriations Committee last night released the fiscal year 2021 Military Construction, Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies Appropriations bill. It will be considered in subcommittee today, starting at 8 pm. This legislation supports our military personnel, bolsters resources for military families, and provides robust funding for veterans’ benefits, healthcare, and other programs. The bill also blocks President Trump from stealing appropriated funds from servicemembers to build an ineffective, nativist border wall, and presses to initiate changes to Confederate-named military installations.

“Our brave servicemembers should not have to live and train on bases named for traitors to the cause of creating a more perfect union,” Wasserman Schultz said. “Betraying the United States is not an act that should be honored, and it’s beyond time for change at those military bases that do that with their namesake. Along with other Democrats and Republicans who favor these changes, I will use all the tools in our legislative toolbox to rectify these misguided historical monikers.” 

Among other components of the fiscal year 2021 Military Construction and Veterans Affairs bill:

  • Provides $250.9 billion in both discretionary and mandatory funding, an increase of $15.2 billion above the fiscal year 2020 enacted level. 

This includes robust funding to expand access and provide better care for veterans, including:

  • $10.3 billion in mental health care services, including $313 million in suicide prevention outreach; $1.9 billion for homeless assistance programs; $661 million for gender-specific care for women; and $504 million for opioid abuse prevention.  

 

f t # e